Morocco

F
Morocco
Recognising animal protection

Recognising animal protection

This theme examines recognition of animal sentience and the importance of animal protection as a societal value within the country, including government support for the Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare, prohibition of cruelty and protection for different categories of animals.

G

Formal recognition of animal sentience

There is no policy or legislation

The country has not developed any policy or legislation by which sentience is acknowledged or recognised.

Draft legislation (Projet de Loi 122-12) was produced in 2013 and has finished its consultation period; this draft law contains provisions on animal health, animal welfare and food safety but does not recognise animal sentience.

Are legal provisions effective in acknowledging animal welfare as a mainstream concern?

There is no evidence from the government to recognise sentience as an independent issue. Recognition of animal sentience does not currently inform public policies that could potentially be linked to animals (such as environmental or sustainable production policies). 

Are there economic and societal barriers to improving animal welfare in the country?

The government has not yet incorporated current practical experience and scientific knowledge regarding animal sentience into the country’s legislation. The government does not appear to consider animal welfare as an important issue, despite the country being a member of the OIE, which has guiding principles on animal welfare that are based on the premise that animals are sentient beings. Although it is positive that the government is considering draft legislation on animal protection, it is noted that the current form of this draft does not recognise animal sentience. This suggests that there are barriers to improvement. The government is encouraged to consider making amendments that reflect the OIE’s guiding principles and the latest scientific knowledge of animal sentience.

Are enforcement mechanisms in place in policy and legislation?

There is no policy or legislation relevant to this indicator.

G

Support for the Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare

There is no government support

The government has not pledged in principle support for the Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare.

Note: The Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare is a proposed formal international acknowledgment of a set of principles giving animal welfare due recognition among governments and the international community. An expression of support for the UDAW demonstrates a government’s commitment to working with the international community to improve animal welfare.

Are legal provisions effective in acknowledging animal welfare as a mainstream concern?

Support for the UDAW would be a first step into integrating animal protection considerations into different discussion tables, becoming a soft law source for decision makers interested in improving animal protection in the country. The government is encouraged to pledge in principle support for the UDAW as this will promote good models of animal welfare policy and help to introduce animal welfare into decision-making processes for other policies.

Are there economic and societal barriers to improving animal welfare in the country?

The government is considering draft legislation that would improve animal health and welfare and this presents an opportunity for action regarding the UDAW.

Are enforcement mechanisms in place in policy and legislation?

There is no policy or legislation relevant to this indicator.

D

Laws against causing animal suffering

Legislation is being discussed or developed

Articles 601, 602 and 603 of the Moroccan Criminal Code No. 1-59-413 1962 prohibit some conduct to certain categories of animals, as part of protection of property. Fish in ponds, tanks and reservoirs, working animals, guard dogs and livestock are protected from poisoning by this legislation. It is prohibited unnecessarily to kill or maim pets or specified animals on the animal’s owner’s land. There are no provisions on animal suffering caused by failure to act.

Draft legislation (Projet de Loi 122-12) was produced in 2013 and has finished the legislative consultation period but has not yet been enacted.  This draft contains provisions on animal welfare at Articles 14 to 17, including a prohibition on ill treatment of tame animals and animals in captivity (Article 14). It does not appear that this will extend to suffering caused by negligence.

Are legal provisions effective in acknowledging animal welfare as a mainstream concern?

The existing legislation is not effective to make this aspect of animal protection a mainstream concern of society in Morocco.

The proposed draft legislation, although positive in many aspects, contains no provisions addressing animal suffering caused by negligent behaviour.

Are there economic and societal barriers to improving animal welfare in the country?

The existing provisions within the Criminal Code have narrow application and are very restrictive on the animals that are protected, restricting protection to certain categories of domestic animals, such as those used for draught and farming purposes.

The existence of the draft legislation shows a government desire for progress in this area; the government is encouraged to conclude the legislative process to enact this law and to put appropriate supporting measures in place.

Are enforcement mechanisms in place in policy and legislation?

Any person who poisons a working or riding animal, livestock, guard dog or fish in ponds, tanks and reservoirs, is liable to a term of imprisonment of one to five years and a fine of 200-500 dirhams.

Any person who unnecessarily kills or maims one of the listed animals or pets on the animal’s owner’s property is liable to a term of imprisonment of two to six months and a fine of 200-250 dirhams. The prison sentence is doubled if the offence took place while trespassing.

Under the draft law, those who commit ill treatment to domestic animals, tame wild animals or captive wild animals would be subject to punishment of a fine of 2,000 to 20,000 dirhams (Article 87).

D

Protecting animals used in farming

Legislation is being discussed or developed

Animals used in farming are included in the protection of Articles 601, 602 and 603 of the Criminal Code, which prohibit poisoning and prohibits maiming and killing on the owner’s land.

There is legislation including a number of decrees covering aspects of using animals in farming, such as decrees on control of specific diseases and on food health and safety, but the legislation does not contain any provisions regarding the welfare of animals used in farming.

The current draft of the proposed new law (Projet de Loi 122-12) includes a prohibition on ill treatment of tame animals and a requirement that animals be kept in conditions compatible with the biological requirements of their species (Article 14), and provides that regulations will be made to protect animals from ill treatment and abusive use and to avoid suffering, especially during specified activities including transport, techniques involved in rearing and husbandry, and slaughter for human consumption or for animal health measures (Article 15).

Are legal provisions effective in acknowledging animal welfare as a mainstream concern?

The Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries appears as the government body in charge of implementing and promoting the existing legislation concerning farm animals. However the existing legislation does not include any acknowledgement of welfare concerns faced by animals used in farming, including issues related to husbandry, housing, transport and slaughter. There is no indication that the Ministry, or any other governmental body, is involved with efforts to promote animal welfare or regulate welfare issues affecting animals used in farming (other than through the proposed draft legislation). Creation of a board or committee within the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries is encouraged to work specifically on animal welfare issues related to farming.

Are there economic and societal barriers to improving animal welfare in the country?

The existing legislation does not go far enough to protect the welfare of animals used in farming owing to the narrow application of the Criminal Code, and the lack of welfare provisions in the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries health laws. There are important links between animal health and animal welfare; however, separate protection of animal welfare is necessary.

A lack of apparent general concern for animals and a lack of awareness of animal sentience and animal welfare present barriers to improvement in this area. However the existence of the draft legislation shows a government desire for progress in this area. The government is encouraged to conclude the legislative process to enact this law and to put appropriate regulations and supporting policy in place.

Are enforcement mechanisms in place in policy and legislation?

Any person who poisons livestock is liable to a term of imprisonment of one to five years and a fine of 200-500 dirhams.

Any person who unnecessarily kills or maims livestock on the animal’s owner’s property is liable to a term of imprisonment of two to six months and a fine of 200-250 dirhams. The prison sentence is doubled if the offence took place while trespassing.

Under the draft law, those who commit ill treatment to domestic animals would be subject to punishment of a fine of 2,000 to 20,000 dirhams (Article 87).

D

Protecting animals in captivity

There is legislation with partial application

Law no. 29-05 on the Protection of Wild Flora and Fauna Species and Regulating Trade contains provisions applicable to animals in captivity. A licence is required to trade, hold or kill any animal protected by CITES or any national endangered species in captivity (Article 5). Licences will be given for specified purposes including for zoos, botanical gardens and exhibitions (Article 6(i)).

The current draft of the proposed new law (Projet de Loi 122-12) includes a prohibition on ill treatment of animals in captivity and a requirement that animals be kept in conditions compatible with the biological requirements of their species (Article 14), and provides that regulations will be made to protect animals from ill treatment and abusive use and to avoid suffering, especially during specified activities including keeping them in zoos and circuses (Article 15).

Are legal provisions effective in acknowledging animal welfare as a mainstream concern?

Animals in captivity are not fully protected by legislation in Morocco; the existing legislation gives very little protection and only for endangered species. There are various welfare concerns facing animals in captivity, which are necessary to include in animal protection legislation in order to make the welfare of these animals a mainstream concern of society.

Are there economic and societal barriers to improving animal welfare in the country?

There is no evidence of a single or unified body in place to develop animal welfare policies in Morocco. The government is encouraged to extend existing animal protection legislation to include animals in captivity. Failure to acknowledge the welfare issues surrounding this category of animals imposes a great constraint on the improvement of animal welfare in Morocco. The inclusion of detailed provisions outlining minimum standards of facilities such as zoos is encouraged. Requirements for the physiological and ethological needs of animals to be satisfied would increase the scope of the legislation for improving captive animal welfare. Requirement of a licence to keep any wild animal in captivity, not only those which are endangered, could enable close monitoring of the welfare standards of such establishments as well as the possibility of intervention when standards are not met.

An apparent lack of general concern about animals and a lack of awareness of animal sentience and welfare present barriers to improvement in this area. However the existence of the draft legislation shows a government desire for progress in this area; the government is encouraged to conclude the legislative process to enact this law and to put appropriate regulations and supporting policy in place.

Are enforcement mechanisms in place in policy and legislation?

Any person who holds an endangered species in captivity without a licence shall be liable to a fine of 5000 to 30,000 dirhams, depending on the conservation status of the species.

Under the draft law, those who commit ill treatment to tame wild animals or captive wild animals would be subject to punishment of a fine of 2,000 to 20,000 dirhams (Article 87).

D

Protecting companion animals

Legislation is being discussed or developed

Articles 601, 602 and 603 of the Moroccan Criminal Code No. 1-59-413 1962 prohibit poisoning guard dogs, and unnecessarily killing or maiming guard dogs and pets on the animal’s owner’s land.

Decree no. 1-96-254 on Law no. 25-96 (avoid contagious diseases on domestic animals) protects the health of companion animals but does not specifically address welfare issues.

The current draft of the proposed new law (Projet de Loi 122-12) includes a prohibition on ill treatment of tame animals (Article 14), and provides that regulations will be made to protect animals from ill treatment and abusive use and to avoid suffering, especially during specified activities including trade in animals, particularly companion animals (Article 15).

Are legal provisions effective in acknowledging animal welfare as a mainstream concern?

The existing legislation protecting companion animals does not acknowledge the specific challenges faced by this category of animal. Various welfare problems that can derive from poor standards of care, neglect or inhumane control of stray populations are not covered by the legislation, and so it is not effective for making the welfare of companion animals a mainstream concern of society.

Are there economic and societal barriers to improving animal welfare in the country?

The existence of animal health legislation for companion animals is significant due to the links between animal health and welfare; however, to improve animal welfare in Morocco, it is necessary to acknowledge welfare an independent issue in legislation. Research did not reveal a body within the government charged with developing further policy for the protection of companion animals in the country. The government is advised to mandate a ministry or department of Morocco with enforcement and promotion of the legislation.

An apparent lack of general concern about animals and a lack of awareness of animal sentience and welfare present barriers to improvement in this area. Traditional attitudes regarding dogs as “unclean” animals may provide a further barrier to progress.

However the existence of the draft legislation shows a government desire for progress in this area. The government is encouraged to conclude the legislative process to enact this law and to put appropriate regulations and supporting policy in place.

Are enforcement mechanisms in place in policy and legislation?

Any person who poisons a guard dog is liable to a term of imprisonment of one to five years and a fine of 200-500 dirhams.

Any person who unnecessarily kills or maims any guard dog or pet on the animal’s owner’s property is liable to imprisonment of two to six months and a fine of 200-500 dirhams. If the offence was committed while trespassing, the prison sentence is doubled.

Under the draft law, those who commit ill treatment to domestic animals would be subject to punishment of a fine of 2,000 to 20,000 dirhams (Article 87).

E

Protecting animals used for draught and recreation

Legislation is being discussed or developed

Articles 601, 602 and 603 of the Moroccan Criminal Code No. 1-59-413 1962 prohibit poisoning, and unnecessarily killing or maiming on the animal’s owner’s land, draught animals, riding animals and beasts of burden.

There is no current legislation applicable to animals used for recreational purposes.

The current draft of the proposed new law (Projet de Loi 122-12) includes a prohibition on ill treatment of animals in captivity (Article 14), and provides that regulations will be made to protect animals from ill treatment and abusive use and to avoid suffering, especially during specified activities including keeping them in zoos and circuses (Article 15). The list of activities prioritised for these regulations does not include the welfare of draught animals. Article 87 of the draft would create an offence of failure to comply with “the law on organising or permitting animal fights”. It is not clear whether or not such a law is already in existence.

Are legal provisions effective in acknowledging animal welfare as a mainstream concern?

The legislation does not contain specific mandates for the protection of animals in these categories. Although animals used for draught are covered in the animal protection provisions within the Criminal Code, there is no acknowledgement of the welfare challenges faced by these animals. In order to raise awareness of the welfare needs of these animals, government communication or effort to promote the legislation on animals used for draught or recreational purposes is recommended. There is no apparent evidence of this and as such, awareness of these regulations and the promotion of animal welfare concepts is presumed to be low within society. Horses and donkeys are commonly used for draught purposes across the country and there are significant welfare issues associated with this group of animals.

Are there economic and societal barriers to improving animal welfare in the country?

The legislation gives some basic protection to animals used for draught purposes but not those used for entertainment purposes, such as in circuses or exhibitions. The current legislation also does not cover situations of neglect. Guidance regarding housing, training, handling and husbandry would be valuable to ensure the welfare of working animals as well as those used in entertainment. There is no evidence that the government has allocated human or financial resources to undertake the development of guidelines or further animal welfare legislation.

Although the existence of the draft legislation shows a government desire for progress in this area, current attitudes towards animals present significant barriers to improvement in this area. Those who own working animals and animals used in informal entertainment (such as for tourist entertainment) may often face financial hardship which, together with lack of education about animal sentience and welfare, provides a substantial barrier to improvement. The government is encouraged to conclude the legislative process to enact this law and to put appropriate regulations and, most importantly, supporting policy in place.

It is reported that NGO involvement with local authorities in certain areas has led to some improvements in the welfare of horses used to pull tourist carriages, through a combination of the provision of free advice and veterinary assistance and licencing procedures requiring good standards of health.[1] It could be beneficial to extend this on a more formal basis to more areas of the country and to animals used to pull loads.

 

[1] http://www.taws.org/TAWS2003-Animal-Welfare-Legislation-Jones.pdf

Are enforcement mechanisms in place in policy and legislation?

Any person who poisons a draft animal, riding animal or beast of burden is liable to a term of imprisonment of one to five years and a fine of 200-500 dirhams.

Any person who unnecessarily kills or maims a draft animal, riding animal or beast of burden on the animal’s owner’s property is liable to a term of imprisonment of two to six months and a fine of 200-250 dirhams. The prison sentence is doubled if the offence took place while trespassing.

Under the draft law, those who commit ill treatment to domestic animals, and those who break the law on organising and permitting animal fights, would be subject to punishment of a fine of 2,000 to 20,000 dirhams (Article 87).

E

Protecting animals used in scientific research

Policy is being discussed or developed

There is no current legislation relevant to this indicator.

The current draft of the proposed new law (Projet de Loi 122-12) includes a prohibition on ill treatment of tame animals and animals in captivity and a requirement that animals be kept in conditions compatible with the biological requirements of their species (Article 14), and provides that regulations will be made to protect animals from ill treatment and abusive use and to avoid suffering, especially during specified activities including use for medical, biological and scientific experiments, which must be limited to case of strict necessity (Article 15).

Are legal provisions effective in acknowledging animal welfare as a mainstream concern?

There are at present no guidelines on animals used in scientific research for this country, including educational, cosmetic or other forms of surgical or invasive manipulation. The new legislation presents an opportunity to develop provisions on animals used in research incorporating the principles of the Three Rs. 

Are there economic and societal barriers to improving animal welfare in the country?

Draft legislation is under consideration demonstrating government interest in making progress with respect to the protection of animals during scientific research. The government is encouraged to conclude the legislative process to enact this law and to put appropriate regulations and, most importantly, supporting policy in place.

Are enforcement mechanisms in place in policy and legislation?

There are no enforcement mechanisms relevant to this indicator.

E

Protecting the welfare of wild animals

There is legislation with partial application

Law no. 29-05 on the Protection of Wild Flora and Fauna Species and Regulating Trade contains provisions applicable to wild animals. A licence is required to trade, hold or kill any animal protected by CITES or any national endangered species in captivity (Article 5).

The proposed draft law (Projet de Loi 122-12) does not contain provisions relating to the protection of wild animals (except when kept in captivity).

Are legal provisions effective in acknowledging animal welfare as a mainstream concern?

The Authority for Water and Forests is the government body responsible for enforcing the relevant legislation. The legislation recognises the value of wild animals, though it is centred on natural resource management, and measures to protect the welfare of individual animals are not specified. The legislation only covers endangered species, and makes no reference to hunting activities involving species that are not vulnerable to extinction. Wild animals are not currently included in the protection within the Criminal Code, as this is focused on protection of property. The authority is encouraged to extend existing wildlife legislation to incorporate welfare protection for wild animals, both endangered and non-endangered species. This would assist in making the welfare of wild animals a mainstream concern of society.

Are there economic and societal barriers to improving animal welfare in the country?

Current legislation should be broadened to impart high value of the individual welfare of all wild animals, not just those deemed valuable based on their conservation status. Research did not find evidence of financial or human resources dedicated to implementing this legislation or developing policy.

The government is encouraged to take the opportunity presented by the foundation of law provided by the protection given to endangered species and to extend protection to all wild animals.

Are enforcement mechanisms in place in policy and legislation?

Any person who contravenes this law shall be liable to a fine of 5000 to 30,000 dirhams, depending on the conservation status of the species.

Governance structures and systems

Governance structures and systems

This theme examines government commitment to improving animal protection. This includes whether there is allocation of responsibility, accountability and resources within government.

E

Government accountability for animal welfare

There is legislation with partial application

The Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries is responsible for implementing various animal health decrees, while the Authority of Water and Forests is responsible for implementation of legislation regarding wildlife.

Research has found no authority responsible for improving animal welfare protection at a high government level.

Are legal provisions effective in acknowledging animal welfare as a mainstream concern?

The existing legislation provides a potential framework for assignment of tasks to responsible bodies to develop policy and legislation. Developing this framework could create authorities specifically responsible for animal welfare in the country. There are links between animal health and animal welfare that could be further explored.  Prevention of animal disease as well as safe and effective veterinary treatment is crucial for providing proper care for animals. Promoting the protection of animal health in turn encourages the consideration of animal welfare. However, it is important for the government to recognise animal welfare as an independent issue alongside that of animal health.

Are there economic and societal barriers to improving animal welfare in the country?

There is some evidence of existing allocation of responsibilities for the development of a small number of issues as specified in the previous indicators. Nonetheless, there is no evidence of direct responsibility for animal welfare promotion in a government body in the country and there is no evidence of financial resource allocated to the development of animal welfare policy. However, the draft legislation provides a potential opportunity to develop a strong framework including responsibility and accountability for improving animal welfare at a high government level.

Are enforcement mechanisms in place in policy and legislation?

It is not clear whether there are any avenues of official challenge to the government ministries which have relevant mandates for animal protection in legislation.

Animal welfare standards

Animal welfare standards

This theme examines whether the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)’s animal welfare standards have been incorporated into law or policy, the extent of engagement with the OIE on animal welfare issues, and whether the government publishes reports on progress in improving animal welfare.

D

Engagement with the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)

There is policy

The country shows some level of engagement with OIE initiatives. The veterinary services of Morocco have been subject to assessment through the OIE’s Performance Veterinary Services (PVS) tool. Accessing the PVS facilities of the OIE and identifying gaps in capacity demonstrates a commitment to engagement with the OIE. However, there remains a lack of legislation and policy development on animal welfare.

Are legal provisions effective in acknowledging animal welfare as a mainstream concern?

The government of Morocco has proactively engaged with the OIE to receive support and guidance on the provision of veterinary services. Although the OIE’s animal welfare standards have not been incorporated into legislation or policy, the PVS facility is a valuable tool for assessing and raising awareness of animal welfare in the country and ensuring that progress is made towards this goal. Further PVS evaluation reports, undertaken at regular intervals, would be useful to measure progress against objectives.

Are there economic and societal barriers to improving animal welfare in the country?

The country’s PVS report has not been made public, and no evidence has been found indicating an allocated budget or department to interact with the OIE on issues regarding animal welfare improvement. Morocco’s last PVS evaluation took place before 2010. Research did not identify any subsequent reports indicating progress towards any introductions of animal welfare standards. Investment by the Moroccan government will be needed to ensure that all of the OIE’s standards are met to protect animal welfare. The draft legislation under discussion provides a vehicle to accelerate progress with respect to transposition and implementation of the OIE standards.

Are enforcement mechanisms in place in policy and legislation?

There are no enforcement mechanisms relevant to this indicator.

G

OIE animal welfare standards

There is no policy or legislation

Existing legislation does not incorporate any of the OIE’s guiding principles for animal welfare.

The draft legislation (Projet de Loi 122-12), written in 2013 but not yet enacted, contains provisions on animal health, animal welfare and food safety. The preamble to the draft contains direct reference to the OIE’s standards as a motivation for the creation of the draft. However the body of the draft law does not incorporate the OIE’s guiding principles and standards for animal welfare. If the draft law is enacted, secondary regulations would need to be produced to incorporate these.

Are legal provisions effective in acknowledging animal welfare as a mainstream concern?

The OIE standards on animal welfare not only represent a consensual position achieved by countries represented in the organisation with regard to this subject matter, but also provide necessary scientific background to produce sound policy and legislation on animal welfare. Incorporating the OIE’s standards into Morocco’s relevant legislation could therefore improve protection for animals in the country and bring Morocco’s legislation in line with other countries in terms of standards of animal welfare.

Are there economic and societal barriers to improving animal welfare in the country?

Transposition of the OIE’s standards and guiding principles on animal welfare into legislation has not yet been achieved in Morocco. There is no evidence of financial or human resource allocated to promote animal welfare issues covered in the standards or guiding principles.

The reference to the OIE’s principles in the 2013 draft legislation is positive; however, there is no clear timeframe for when the law may be enacted, nor information regarding the body that will be tasked with its implementation and enforcement. Additionally the draft text does not incorporate the OIE’s principles and standards for animal welfare.

Are enforcement mechanisms in place in policy and legislation?

There is no policy or legislation relevant to this indicator.  

G

Reporting on progress

There is no policy or legislation

There is no evidence of policy or legislation to suggest that the government captures, analyses and produces publicly available information on the progress of animal welfare improvement in the country. 

Are legal provisions effective in acknowledging animal welfare as a mainstream concern?

The introduction of legislation or policy requiring the production of government reports would be beneficial to promote and progress animal protection and animal welfare. Reporting could also assist the government with respect to assessing the effectiveness of its legislation and policy.

Are there economic and societal barriers to improving animal welfare in the country?

There is no evidence that the government has allocated budget or human resource to producing comprehensive monitoring and reporting systems in the country. However the draft legislation under discussion indicates some government interest in the issue and presents an opportunity to put reporting mechanisms into place.

Are enforcement mechanisms in place in policy and legislation?

There is no evidence of existing legislation or policy in the country relevant to this indicator.

Providing humane education

Providing humane education

This theme examines whether issues of animal care and protection are included in the national education system at primary and secondary level, and comments on whether animal welfare issues such as humane handling form part of veterinary medicine education.

G

Education on animal care and protection

There is no policy or legislation

There is no apparent evidence of the inclusion of animal care and protection in the curriculum of compulsory education.

At school level, animal welfare is taught by NGOs at a number of education centres across the country, but this is not part of the formal curriculum.[1]

There is currently only one veterinary facility in Morocco, at the Institut Agronomique et Vétérinaire Hassan II (Rabat campus), and no inclusion of animal welfare in the curriculum was found.

 

[1] For example https://spana.org/country/morocco

Are legal provisions effective in acknowledging animal welfare as a mainstream concern?

Formalisation of animal welfare components within a country’s education system is a powerful way to raise awareness of the concept of animal welfare within society. In the case of Morocco, there is no evidence of formal education plans or curriculums with animal welfare content in compulsory education. To effectively make animal welfare a mainstream concern of society, it is recommended that measures are taken to mandate the presence of animal welfare in the national curriculum.

Are there economic and societal barriers to improving animal welfare in the country?

There is no evidence that Morocco’s education system includes any reference to animal welfare. Inclusion of animal welfare as a required course in the education system would embed the importance and benefits of humane treatment of animals within society. This is particularly important for the many communities which rely on animals for their livelihoods. It is not clear from legislation whether human and financial resources have been allocated to the development and delivery of animal welfare content in schools. This does not appear to be a government priority.

Are enforcement mechanisms in place in policy and legislation?

There is no evidence of existing policy or legislation relevant to this indicator. 

Promoting communication and awareness

Promoting communication and awareness

This theme examines whether there is government consultation and engagement with relevant stakeholders on animal protection issues, such as the development of new legislation and policy and the licensing of scientific research using animals.

D

Consultation with stakeholders

There is policy

The existing legislation does not prevent participation of experts and relevant stakeholders, but it does not require decision-making processes to be accompanied with consultation.

Research has revealed some engagement of the Ministry of Agriculture with NGOs during the drafting of proposed legislation (Projet de Loi 122-12); however, the government has not indicated a timeframe or a responsible body for implementing the proposed law.

The Moroccan Society for the Protection of Animals and Nature reports that it has partnered with government bodies including the Ministry of Agriculture and the Ministry of Education[1].  It is reported that NGO involvement with local authorities in certain areas has led to some improvements in the welfare of horses used to pull tourist carriages, through a combination of the provision of free advice and veterinary assistance and licencing procedures requiring good standards of health.[2] This appears to have been motivated by a desire to ‘clean up’ the image presented to foreign tourists. It would be beneficial if this relationship could be formalised and extended to include animals that are not involved in tourism.

 

[1] https://spana.org/country/morocco

[2] http://www.taws.org/TAWS2003-Animal-Welfare-Legislation-Jones.pdf

Are legal provisions effective in acknowledging animal welfare as a mainstream concern?

There is some informal involvement between government and NGOs in relation to the draft proposed legislation (Projet de Loi 122-12) and some draught animals.

Further engagement with relevant stakeholders who work within the fields utilising animals and with NGOs promoting animal welfare, is encouraged to provide expertise in the subject and further promote animal protection in the country’s legislation.  

Are there economic and societal barriers to improving animal welfare in the country?

Relevant stakeholders, including NGOs and the OIE, may be able to assist the government in developing legislation (including secondary legislation subsidiary to the proposed new law Projet de Loi 122-12) and can provide valuable advice that could lead to more comprehensive and stronger policy and regulation.

It is clear that some government authorities are prepared to engage with NGOs and other relevant stakeholders and this may assist in the future with improving animal welfare.

Are enforcement mechanisms in place in policy and legislation?

There are no enforcement mechanisms relevant to this indicator.

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Morocco had a largely agriculture based recovery in 2013, however, should experience sluggish growth in 2014. Despite this, BMI holds the view that Morocco “will remain a relative outperformer in North Africa over the medium term”, due to investors viewing Morocco “as an export-oriented manufacturing hub for the European Market” and the positive contribution of the tourism industry. The EIU forecasts real GDP growth of to average 4.9% for the period 2014-18. The recovery of Europe should also bolster activity in the non-agricultural industries, contributing to growth. In the long term, the EIU forecasts real GDP growth to average out at 4.6% for the period 2012-30.

 

 

Date of information: 11/02/2014
Population 
32,521,143
GDP 
$95,981,572,517
GDP (PPP) 
$5,193
Education expenditure (% of GDP) 
5.4 (2009)